For you created my inmost being; you knit me together in my mother's womb
Psalm 139:13

Tuesday, 10 May 2016

Comparison and what comes next



I wonder what our blogs would look like if we stopped comparing ourselves to others? 

I read Truly Myrtle's amazingly honest post on comparison last week and it really got the old grey matter churning. I've been blogging slowly and quietly for quite a long time, but in the last couple of years, as blogs have become way more professional looking with stunning design and photography and what seems like exhaustive scheduling, I often feel like I'm lagging behind. Like a little sardine lost in a school of shiny dolphins. 

It's so reassuring to know that I'm not the only one who sometimes falls foul of the comparison blues, and there seems to be a lot of openness and discussion around this topic at the moment. In the last year, I've really come to value honesty in blogs and have tried to be more honest in my own sharing here. I reckon it's helpful for the reader and prompts more genuine interactions. Expertly styled photography and glorious designs are amazing and they can inspire and challenge us, but I think it's the truth in the writing that really counts and helps counteract those glossy, almost unattainable views that we sometimes see. And of course it's good to remember that every blog post and Instagram pic is just one aspect that an individual has carefully curated and chosen to share, not a whole, accurate picture.

On episode three of Blogtacular's podcast (it's pretty rad), there was a brilliant interview with Fran Stone of Fall for DIY. She made a 2016 prediction for a return to a slower form of blogging, favouring quality of content over click-baiting and frequency, with perhaps longer, more thoughtful posts, and seeking a faithful readership. Honestly, this was music to my ears. Blogging isn't my full time job (quite clearly!). I only started sharing in this wee space because I started reading other blogs and love to tell stories, see what other crafters are making and share my own creations. But I've often considered stopping altogether as the more blogs I was reading, the more inadequate I felt. So many frustrations arose -  unless you blog for a living, literally who is able to blog everyday? (If this is you, tell me all your secrets!). How much can I really improve my photography with a point and shoot and zero knowledge? How can I improve my blog design without any software, digital design skills or budget? Argh!

It's so silly, of course, because none of that matters at all. I was only having these frustrations because I was comparing myself to others, not because I was unhappy with what I was sharing. I only need to share what I want, when I want, how I want and be content with it. There are no rules. Maybe it's a case of dance like nobody's watching, blog like nobody's reading? I'd love to know your thoughts on this and how you combat the comparison blues.  

8 comments:

  1. Hi Becca,
    Thank you for sharing this! I love reading your blog via Feedly.
    I do recognise feelings of comparison, since I have a video podcast. I found it quite difficult to just enjoy the process, and the likes and the subscribers, and not compare it with podcasts of other people.

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    1. Hello Mariette, It's nice to know you're out there! It's soooo hard not to compare, isn't it? My plan is to just focus on writing and creative stuff that I love. Will be checking out your podcast :) x

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  2. I hear you, it feels like everyone has amazing, professional-level photos not just on their blogs, but their instagram, with a million followers... I don't know anyone not affected by the comparison bug from time to time. But I do think there is room for us all- and I actually don't follow many accounts/blogs that have massive (like, 10k and up) follows. I find those are the ones I especially find hard to look at and feel like what I'm doing has any value. And I love your blog!

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    1. Hi Julie, ugh, so reassuring to know that most of us feel like this at some, no matter how 'successful' we might be. I quite like your idea of completely cutting out any blogs that make you feel a bit pants. Love your blog right back! :) x

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  3. I've spent the last two years wanting to start a blog so I can have a record of what I make. Also to join in some things, where people link in what they've made. I'd like that. But I keep reading how blogging is over, seeing some of my favourite blogs get book deals, get covered in advertising and sponsored posts and/or disappear. I see people post apologies for not having posted for a week because they've been ill. Post after post about how to get the perfect photo/filter your pictures/manage your word-photo balance. Who needs that kind of pressure? But then I decided that like you say, it's the same thing as everything else in life. Some of these things are important to some people. That doesn't mean I need to make them important to me. I decided last week to give a blog a go as soon as I've got a couple of things out the way, end of Jan-ish. Thanks for the post. X

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    1. Hello Sarah! I know exactly what you mean. Why should we be apologising? It's entirely up to us what we post, and how often. The beauty of the blog is that it's your space to do exactly what you please with. I'd love to read your blog when you get going! Please pop back and send me a link when it's live! :) x

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  4. Ah yes. The comparison blues. I don't have a remedy but I do try to push them aside. I am working on enjoying the process without putting expectations on the results. Only just found your space. Off to do some more reading.

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  5. Couldn't agree more, I think we all feel like that from time to time. I love the 'dance like nobody's watching', we probably should indeed blog like nobody is reading!

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penny for your thoughts . . .

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